In today's tech-driven business landscape, iPhones have become indispensable tools for active professionals. They're not only simple, streamlined communication solutions – they also store calendars, provide instant access to social media, and even help you stay in shape. As iPhone users in the business world know, having the latest Apple products is important for website hosting, efficient correspondence, and staying ahead of the competition. But when faced with the choice between two versions of the same model, what are professionals to do? Many businesses are currently scratching their heads over whether to adopt the iPhone 7 or the iPhone 7 Plus.

What are the main differences between the iPhone 7 and the iPhone 7 Plus? 
Size is the main distinction between Apple's two newest models. The standard iPhone 7 has a 4.7 inch display, while the Plus boasts a 5.5 inch display. This means that while the standard model is similar in size to iPhones past, the Plus is significantly larger. 

Another notable difference between the two phones is their camera quality. Trusted Review explained that the iPhone 7 includes two cameras in one, which allows users to zoom in without the image becoming pixilated or grainy. It does this by vacillating between a 56 mm telephoto lens and a 28 mm wide-angle lens, noted the source. The iPhone 7 Plus also offers a feature called "portrait mode," which allows users to mimic the visual effects of a high quality, professional camera by bringing the subject into focus while softly blurring the backdrop. 

IPhones have become indispensable tools for professionals in a broad spectrum of industries.  IPhones have become indispensable tools for professionals in a broad spectrum of industries.

Why businesses should consider the iPhone 7 Plus 
While the differences between the two models might seem small, they can have big impacts on business practices. Here are five reasons companies should embrace the iPhone 7 Plus:

1. It has a longer battery life 
The size of the iPhone 7 Plus allows it to hold a larger battery, reported Forbes, which means it's able to last longer in between chargings. This model, as well as the standard iPhone 7, no longer contain the traditional headphone jack, which also opens up room for more battery power. The source noted that the total battery size in the iPhone 7 Plus is 2887mAh, which represents a five percent increase over the iPhone 6 Plus. This is great news for on-the-go professionals who use their phones all day long, for everything from emails to social media to conference calls, and may not have much time to plug in. 

2. It has a superior display
The iPhone 7 Plus' larger size also means it's able to deliver a higher quality display than the one available on the iPhone 7. As BGR stated, the screen of the Plus "is so much better than the screen on the iPhone 7 that it's difficult to describe." The iPhone 7 has a resolution of 720p, while the Plus boasts 1080p. This allows graphics, colors and videos to appear brighter and more defined on the larger model. The crisp, clean, professional screen of the iPhone 7 Plus makes it a must-have for tech-focused organizations that are looking to prioritize digital leadership. 

"The Plus' image-capturing abilities can enhance social media strategies."

3. It could cut down media production costs 
Standard iPhone camera quality has long been sharp enough to replace digital cameras for day-to-day image capturing, but many businesses still rely on professional-grade cameras to produce pictures for digital and print outreach. This could soon change, however, with the upgraded camera features now available on the iPhone 7 Plus. Even industry professionals agree – after taking the iPhone 7 Plus camera out for spin, San Francisco-based photographer Ken Walton told Venture Beat: 

"It's really, really making all the difference. I finally feel like I could do real work — like, a serious photograph."

Companies that embrace the iPhone 7 plus could ultimately cut down on costs associated with professional photography, and greatly simplify small yet important projects, like taking high-quality headshots of each employee. The Plus' image-capturing abilities can also enhance social media strategies by enabling professional-grade images to be posted on-the-go and in real time. 

Trusted Review noted that harnessing the true power of Apple's latest camera design still somewhat requires an eye for photography. Lighting still has a huge impact on image quality, and subjects undoubtedly appear clearest and most robust when captured in full illumination. When using Portrait Mode for official images, always position the subject in a bright area, recommended the source. Additionally, always stand about six or seven feet away from the subject, as this is the orientation at which Portrait Mode works most efficiently. 

4. It provides more basic storage 
There's nothing more frustrating than trying to take a photo or download an app and receiving the dreaded "storage is full" notification. This is especially true for iPhone-reliant business professionals, who may need to store high numbers of emails, files, and images to their mobile devices. That's where the iPhone 7 Plus comes in handy – Apple boosted its basic storage option on this model, providing users with a minimum of 32GB, as opposed to its traditional 16GB. Employees will be able to keep more information and resources at their fingertips without worrying about what files they may have to delete in order to make room for more. 

5. It's tough
Apple upped its durability game with its latest models, much to the excitement of every iPhone user who's ever lost their mobile device to a pool or puddle. The iPhone 7 Plus – as well as the standard iPhone 7 – was developed to meet the IP67 standard, reported Business News Daily. The design prevents some water exposure from leaving any discernable damage to these devices, so taking a call in the rain or nervously spilling water before a big presentation won't automatically fry your device. This is good news for companies, who may be on the financial hook for replacing employees' damaged phones, as well as individual workers, who need technology strong enough to endure their active lifestyles.